Oppose Bill Allowing Use of Dogs, Cats as Live Bait!

Oppose Bill Allowing Use of Dogs, Cats as Live Bait!

Unbelievably, the Idaho Senate is considering Senate Bill (S.B.) 1305, which would permit ranchers to kill wolves by using live animals—including dogs and cats—as bait! Making matters worse, aerial gunning from powered parachutes and ultralight airplanes would be allowed, as would bowhunting. These methods commonly leave animals maimed! Wolves in this region are already being hunted, but the tactics proposed in S.B. 1305 are exceedingly cruel. This bill passed out of the subcommittee and is now in the hands of the full Senate.

Your voice is needed today!

Please politely urge Idaho state senators to oppose S.B. 1305. E-mail addresses and phone numbers for Idaho senators can be found here

http://legislature.idaho.gov/senate/membership.cfm

http://legislature.idaho.gov/legislation/2012/S1305.pdf#xml=http://legislature.search.idaho.gov/isysquery/bf96ad8a-30bf-42e2-a8c6-3278c1a0cd89/1/hilite

S1305.

Urge Congress to Protect Horses in Racing Industry

Urge Congress to Protect Horses in Racing Industry

horseracing 300x200 Urge Congress to Protect Horses in Racing IndustryThe use of drugs in thoroughbred horses by the racing industry is widespread and deadly. Trainers and veterinarians frequently give horses legal drugs to mask the pain from stress or injury in order to keep them on the track when they should be resting, not racing. A powerful diuretic called Lasix (or Salix) is widely used, supposedly to stop horses’ lungs from bleeding—even if the horses aren’t prone to bleeding—because horses on this drug run faster and have a greater weight advantage (because of increased urine production) over other horses. Lasix also has the ability to mask the presence of other—often illegal—drugs by “flushing out” the system. Lasix is banned in most countries on race day, but more than 90 percent of thoroughbreds in the U.S. are given the drug just hours before a race.

 

In 2008, the overwhelming consensus at a congressional hearing on horseracing, for which PETA supplied testimony, was that drugs were at the root of many of the animal welfare issues in the racing industry. Horses are given drugs to make them run and turn a profit. The Interstate Horseracing Improvement Act of 2011 (H.R. 1733) would prohibit the use of performance-enhancing drugs in racing horses and would require the first-place winner and one other randomly chosen horse to be tested for drugs at all races.

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