Finding a missing cat

Finding a missing cat

finding a missingcat 1024x683 Finding a missing cat

Most of the cats that were located had not gone far from their homes. Indoor-only cats were found 128 feet from home, on average, and indoor-outdoor cats 985 feet from home (although this distinction was not significant). For all the cats (indoors, indoor-outdoor, outdoors), the house’s median distance was 164 feet, and 75% of cats were located within 1600 feet.

This means that if your cat is missing, you should search very precisely close to home. Being cats, you will not be astonished to discover that some of those found turned up waiting by the door to be let in. Cats were often found in nearby hiding places such as hiding in a yard, in bushes, under decks, or inside sheds. Cats that were considered prying were the most likely to be found in a neighbor’s house. Most lost cars are near you.

A physical search for the cat was most likely to be successful, and this included searching the yard and surrounding area, calling the cat while looking for it, asking neighbors if they had seen the cat and would keep an eye out for it or help search, and walking around during the day looking for the cat. 

The most triumphant advertising tactics were putting up posters and distributing flyers about the cat. Although many people called their local shelter about their missing cat in this study, it was not a common way for them to be reunited (fewer than 2%).

It’s also worth considering the strategies people use if they find a lost pet. It seems many people will not take the animal to a local shelter/animal control because of fears of euthanasia. Instead, the tactics they use to find owners include advertisements in the newspaper, walking around the neighborhood, and putting up signs. 

Social media has grown considerably since this survey was done and is likely a much more significant factor these days. Still, it is essential to remember that some owners may not be reached by this method as not everyone uses social media.

Remember to think about what it feels like for your cat and the kinds of places where they might hide. Cats have flexible spines, and their collar bone is not connected to other bones so that they can squeeze into narrow gaps. If they are timid and shy, be quiet when searching so that you won’t startle them. Also, think about what happened before them disappearing if it gives any clues as to where they might be.

If your cat has just run out of the door, don’t chase them. Keep them insight and try to persuade them to come to you; this may involve getting low down, calling them, not looking directly at them (which can be scary to a cat), and reaching your hand or a finger out to see if they will come up to you. Shaking the treat packet may also help. 

An indoors-only cat will want to get home again, so make sure they have a clear path back indoors and don’t get in their way.

Many lost cats come home by themselves.

If you are not sure where your cat is, search carefully inside the house if they are under furniture, in a wardrobe, in the basement, or some other hiding place. Cats can get into some surprising places, especially if they are fearful and new to your home. A friend had a cat hide inside a box-spring mattress. Similarly, they may be able to get inside your settee, open cupboard doors or drawers (which may shut behind them), hide in small gaps behind furniture, get in behind the washing machine or fridge, hide behind books on shelves, or curl up underneath your clean linen.

The most successful strategy is searching on foot. Most cats are found close to home and search very (very) carefully in the immediate area. 

Look in places where a scared cat might hide, such as in bushes, in sheds, under decks. Remember to look up too, since cats like high places and might be hiding in the branches of a tree or on the roof of a shop or shed.

It’s a good idea to search at a quiet time of day.

After dark, you can search with a flashlight. You might see the light reflect from their eyes. When searching, take a treat packet with you and shake it from time to time, but remember a scared cat may not dare to come out to you.

If your kit is indoor-only, you could put their litter box out close to the point where they left. The idea is that cats have excellent noses and will be able to smell it. They may find it reassuring, come back to use it, or wait nearby. However, if your cat has outdoor access, there seems little point in doing this as they will be used to toileting outside anyway, and the smell may only bring other cats into the area to investigate.

Make a hiding place right by the door. A cardboard box turned upside down, and with a hole cut out to make an entrance will do. Put some of your cat’s bedding inside it. You’re providing somewhere for your cat to hide if they come back when you aren’t there to let them in. You can put food and water nearby too (but be aware that this may attract rodents and other animals).

Remember to listen in case you hear your cat meowing. If you have a baby monitor, you could leave it outside the front door in case you hear a meow. If you have a trail cam, set it up so that you will see if your cat is in your yard (or your neighbor’s yard, with permission).

Speak to neighbors and ask if they have seen your cat. Ask them to check hiding places on their property carefully, or if they will let you search their yard for your cat.

If you find your cat in a tree and believe them to be stuck, call local arborists to find one who will go up to get your cat. Sometimes shelters or community cat organizations keep a list of arborists willing to rescue cats from trees.

Make ‘lost cat’ flyers with your cat’s photo on them and put them up in the neighborhood where people will see them, such as near community mailboxes or on utility poles. Include your phone number so that people can contact you if they see your cat, but don’t put your name and address for security reasons.

Post your ‘lost cat’ flyer to social media too. Make the post public so that it is shareable, and share it with any missing pets and neighborhood groups in your area. Again, don’t post your address.

Call your vet and tell them your cat is missing. You might be able to put up a flyer at their office too.

Visit your local animal shelter and animal control in case someone has taken your cat there. Some will take details of missing cats to keep on file. 

If you have recently moved house, you should also search back at your old address, as there have been cases of cats going back to where they used to live.

If you want to put out a trap for your cat, your local shelter, community cat rescue, or animal control may be able to assist. 

.

Above all, keep searching close to home (very close to home for an indoors-only cat). This is the most important thing to do. When you find your cat, remember to update social media postings and take down the flyers you put up in the neighborhood.

 Tips to Help Find a Lost Cat

  1. Start Looking Early
  2. Start Looking Close By
  3. Talk to Your Neighbours
  4. Think Like Your Cat
  5. Put Up Posters
  6. Look When It’s Dark and Quiet
  7. Set Up a Baby Monitor
  8. Use Facebook and Other Social Media
  9. Think Positively
  10. Don’t Give Up

If you think your cat is hiding nearby, you can try putting out some strong-smelling fish when it gets dark. Do it concurrently every night, then try to keep watch from a distance to see if your cat will venture out to eat it. When he is starving enough, he will venture out when he feels secure, generally under night cover.

 Indoor cats that have escaped are very likely to be hiding near your house. They have panicked and gone into survival mode, so they are probably hiding within a three house radius. They are too frightened to move and will likely not respond to your calls. They are hiding in silence not to attract any predators; they are following their survival instinct.

When any cat is hurt or scared, they are likely to go into hiding and not respond to your calls. You have to remember that cats don’t think like humans. Even though they may recognize your voice, they may not respond to it because their ancestor instincts tell them its safer to remain quiet so as not to attract any attention.

Look When It’s Dark and Calm

If your cat is lost or sneaking, it may be waiting until it’s dark to come out and search for food. Therefore, it is best to try and wait until late at night when the roads are quiet to look for your cat. At this time, your cat is more likely to hear your calls and to respond. Remember to stop from time to time and listen to your cat.

Teller County Sheriff: warrant issued for a Trump’s supporter accused of beating and dismembering 2 dogs

Teller County Sheriff: warrant issued for a Trump’s supporter accused of beating and dismembering 2 dogs

The Teller County Sheriff’s Office has issued a warrant for a man they say beat and dismembered two dogs.

Officials say the suspect is 30-year-old Matthew Stephen Dieringer, a Trump supporter, from Pueblo, Colorado. He is being accused of killing two of his roommate’s dogs.

mattewaaa Teller County Sheriff: warrant issued for a Trumps supporter accused of beating and dismembering 2 dogs

They add Dieringer was last seen in the Manitou Springs area and has an active felony warrant for two counts of Aggravated Cruelty to animals. At this time, officials believe he may have dyed his hair another color, possibly darker.

In a statement released Tuesday, the sheriff’s department said, “Dieringer is alleged to have beaten to death the victim’s brown, seven-year-old Australian Cattle Dog “Suka” and also to have killed and dismembered the victim’s other black dog, “Hayoka.” A necropsy confirmed Suka died of blunt trauma.”

Prego Launches Vegan Pasta Sauce

Prego Launches Vegan Pasta Sauce

Pasta sauce brand Prego just launched their plant-based vegan meat sauce. The sauce is not only their first vegan meat-based sauce but also the United States and possibly the world.

PREGOSAUCE 1024x683 Prego Launches Vegan Pasta Sauce

The new vegan pasta sauce line is called Prego+ Plant Protein and is a tomato-based sauce that contains soy-based ground meat with 4 grams of protein per serving.


“We were inspired to create Prego+ Plant Protein for consumers who are increasingly integrating plant-based foods into their diets to get additional protein,” said Steve Siegal, Vice President of Marketing, Meals & Sauces.

Adopting a senior pet

Adopting a senior pet

adopt a senior doag 683x1024 Adopting a senior pet

All shelters have older dogs and cats waiting for someone to adopt them into a loving home. There are many reasons why choosing a senior pet can be a beautiful thing to do.

Older pets have much to give and make some of the best mates. We believe that just as animals of all ages should have loving partners, so should people.

When you open your heart and home to an older dog or cat, they show appreciation and are likely to form an incredible bond with their new human guardians. It has also been shown there are many benefits to adopting an older animal.

Giving a senior dog or cat a cozy home to live out the rest of their lives is one of the most selfless and loving things you can do. Many animals have had full experiences with loving families, but for one reason or another, their loved ones couldn’t take care of them anymore.

PETA’s Shareholder Proposal Calls for Thorough Evaluation of Near-Drowning Experiments on Mice and Rats

PETA’s Shareholder Proposal Calls for Thorough Evaluation of Near-Drowning Experiments on Mice and Rats

Indianapolis – When Eli Lilly shareholders join the company’s virtual annual meeting on Monday, they’ll have the opportunity to vote on a proposal from PETA—which owns stock in the company—that the company assesses the effectiveness of the forced swim test and report its findings to shareholders.

Since November 2018, PETA and more than 325,000 members of the public have contacted Eli Lilly to request a formal policy banning the use, funding, or commissioning of the test . In the widely discredited test, mice and other small animals are placed in inescapable beakers filled with water and made to swim to keep from drowning, purportedly to shed light on the effectiveness of anti-depressant medications. But it has been heavily criticized by scientists who argue that when the terrified mice begin to float, it isn’t a sign of depression or despair, as some claim, but rather a positive indicator of learning, saving energy, and adapting to a new environment.

“While the fear of drowning is very real for the animals involved in the forced swim test, the experience in no way represents the enduring and multidimensional nature of depression,” says PETA neuroscientist Dr. Emily Trunnell. “When nine of Eli Lilly’s biggest competitors have banned this atrocity at PETA’s request, it’s baffling that it refuses to acknowledge that it’s defending archaic practices.”

Between 1993 and 2019, Eli Lilly employees published at least 20 papers and submitted at least 11 patent applications describing the use of the forced swim test in experiments involving more than 3,400 mice and rats. Yet the test did not reliably predict the success of a single medication. Eli Lilly’s one successful antidepressant that’s known to help humans, Prozac, doesn’t yield consistent results in the forced swim test.

Bayer, AstraZeneca, Novo Nordisk A/S, Johnson & Johnson, AbbVie, Roche, Boehringer Ingelheim, Pfizer, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Sage Therapeutics, and other pharmaceutical companies banned the forced swim test after hearing from PETA.

PETA—whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to experiment on”—opposes speciesism, a human-supremacist worldview that fosters violence toward other animals.

For more information, please visit PETA.org or click here.

1918 FLU PANDEMIC

Why the Second Wave of the 1918 Spanish Flu Was So Bloody

People are so ready to get back to life, forgetting that in 1918 the second wave of the Spanish Flu reportedly killed 20-50 million. The first wave only killed 3-5 million. History does indeed repeat.

The horrific scale of the 1918 influenza pandemic—known as the “Spanish flu”—is hard to fathom. The virus infected 500 million people worldwide and killed an estimated 20 million to 50 million victims—that’s more than all of the soldiers and civilians died during World War I consolidated. 

While the global pandemic lasted for twenty-four months, a significant amount of deaths were packed into three exceptionally rough months in the autumn of 1918. Annalists now accept that the deadly sharpness of the Spanish Flu’s “second wave” was caused by a mutated virus dispersed by wartime company actions.

When the Spanish Flu first appeared in early March 1918, it had all the hallmarks of the seasonal Flu, albeit a profoundly transmissible, infectious contagious, dangerous, and destructive strain. One of the first recorded cases was Albert Gitchell, a U.S. Army cook at Camp Funston in Kansas, who was hospitalized with a 104-degree fever. The virus expanded swiftly through the Army base, home to 54,000 troops. By the end of the month, 1,100 soldiers had been hospitalized, and 38 had fallen after contracting pneumonia.

As U.S. troops stationed en masse for the war effort in Europe, they carried the Spanish Flu with them. Throughout April and May of 1918, the virus flowed like wildfire through England, France, Spain, and Italy. A predicted three-quarter of the French military was tainted in the spring of 1918 and as many as half of British troops. Yet the first wave of the virus didn’t appear to be particularly deadly, with symptoms like high fever and malaise usually lasting only three days. According to restricted public health data from the time, fatality rates were related to annual Flu.

Historians believe that the fast spread of Spanish Flu in the fall of 1918 was somewhat to impute on public health officials opposed to imposing quarantines during wartime. In Britain, for example, a government official named Arthur Newsholme understood full well that a strict private lockdown was the most reliable way to fight the scope of the profoundly infectious virus. But he wouldn’t jeopardize damaging the battle manufacturers by keeping munitions industry artisans and other noncombatants homely.

According to many researchers, “the constant needs of warfare proved to incur [the] risk of spreading disease” and encouraged Britons to “carry on” during the pandemic.

A severe nursing shortage further thwarted the public health answer to the crisis in the United States as thousands of nurses had been deployed to military camps and the front lines. The deficit was worsened by the American Red Cross’s refusal to use trained African American nurses until the worst of the pandemic had already passed.

1918 Pandemic (H1N1 virus)

Other Languages

pandeminc header 2 Why the Second Wave of the 1918 Spanish Flu Was So Bloody

The 1918 influenza pandemic was the most severe pandemic in recent history. It was caused by an H1N1 virus with genes of avian origin. Although there is no universal consensus regarding where the virus originated, it spread worldwide from 1918-1919.  In the United States, it was first identified in military personnel in spring 1918. It is estimated that about 500 million people or one-third of the world’s population became infected with this virus. The number of deaths was estimated to be at least 50 million worldwide with about 675,000 occurring in the United States.

Mortality was high in people younger than 5 years old, 20-40 years old, and 65 years and older. The high mortality in healthy people, including those in the 20-40 year age group, was a unique feature of this pandemic. While the 1918 H1N1 virus has been synthesized and evaluated, the properties that made it so devastating are not well understood. With no vaccine to protect against influenza infection and no antibiotics to treat secondary bacterial infections that can be associated with influenza infections, control efforts worldwide were limited to non-pharmaceutical interventions such as isolation, quarantine, good personal hygiene, use of disinfectants, and limitations of public gatherings, which were applied unevenly.

Urgent From PETA: Hot-Weather Survival Tips for Animals

Urgent From PETA: Hot-Weather Survival Tips for Animals

hotweather 1024x684 Urgent From PETA: Hot Weather Survival Tips for Animals

Austin, Texas – With record-breaking high temperatures expected this weekend in Texas, animals can quickly succumb to heatstroke if left outdoors. In the past two years, there have been at least 114 hot weather-related animal deaths—and these are just the ones that have been reported. Most aren’t.

Anyone who leaves animals outside to suffer in severe weather may be prosecuted for cruelty.

The following tips will help keep animal companions safe in hot weather:

  • Keep animals indoors. Unlike humans, dogs can sweat only through their footpads and cool themselves by panting, so even brief sun exposure can have life-threatening consequences. Anyone who sees animals in distress and is unable to help should note their locations and alert authorities immediately.
  • Never leave an animal inside a hot vehicle. Temperatures can quickly soar in parked cars, and a dog trapped inside can die from heatstroke within minutes—even if the car is in the shade with the windows slightly open, which has little to no effect on lowering the temperature inside the car. PETA offers an emergency window-breaking hammer for help with intervening in life-or-death situations.
  • Avoid hot pavement. When outdoor temperatures reach the 80s, asphalt temperatures can climb to 140 degrees, causing pain, burns, and permanent damage to dogs’ paws after just a few minutes of contact. Walk dogs on grass whenever possible, and avoid walking in the middle of the day. Never run with dogs in hot weather—they’ll collapse before giving up, at which point, it may be too late to save them.

PETA has released a warm-weather public service announcement featuring Mckenna Grace. For more information, visit PETA.org.

Microchipped pets are 2.5 times more likely to be returned to their owners.

Microchipped pets are 2.5 times more likely to be returned to their owners.

What is a Pet Microchip?

Pet microchips are small, permanent identification chips that are about the size of a grain of rice. They are injected between the shoulder blades with a needle, and the process is about as quick as a vaccination. Most pets go through the one-time process without so much as a squeak. The estimated cost to implant and register a microchip ranges from about $25 to $75. However, VIP Petcare charges only $19, with free lifetime registration.

VIP Petcare microchips are internationally recognized and meet ISO requirements (International Organization for Standardization). This promotes compatibility between chips and scanners. VIP Petcare uses universal scanners, which read multiple microchip frequencies sold by different microchip manufacturers.

Your pet’s microchip ID code, just like your pet, is one of a kind. When your lost pet is taken to an animal shelter or veterinary clinic, they will scan your pet for a microchip and read its unique code. This code is stored with your pet’s profile and linked to your contact information.

Registration and keeping your contact information updated is just as necessary as microchipping. VIP Petcare automatically registers every recorded and implanted microchip into the found.org database within five days. Found Animals Microchip Registry is a free, national, nonprofit database that was conceived in support of a single belief: all lost pets need to find their way home.

Identification tags can become lost quickly, and tattoos may not always be legible. Only about 15% of dogs and 2% of cats without permanent identification return home to their owners. Approximately 9 million companion animals are admitted to shelters in the U.S. every year. Many of these are euthanized because their owners cannot be found.

Only a pet microchip can offer a genuinely permanent identification. Hundreds of thousands of pets have returned home thanks to a chip.

The American Veterinary Medical Association, the American Animal Hospital Association, and the Humane Society of the United States all recommend microchipping.

Flat 12% of on New arrival. Use code:SAVE12K
Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial