Finding a missing cat

Finding a missing cat

finding a missingcat 1024x683 Finding a missing cat

Most of the cats that were located had not gone far from their homes. Indoor-only cats were found 128 feet from home, on average, and indoor-outdoor cats 985 feet from home (although this distinction was not significant). For all the cats (indoors, indoor-outdoor, outdoors), the house’s median distance was 164 feet, and 75% of cats were located within 1600 feet.

This means that if your cat is missing, you should search very precisely close to home. Being cats, you will not be astonished to discover that some of those found turned up waiting by the door to be let in. Cats were often found in nearby hiding places such as hiding in a yard, in bushes, under decks, or inside sheds. Cats that were considered prying were the most likely to be found in a neighbor’s house. Most lost cars are near you.

A physical search for the cat was most likely to be successful, and this included searching the yard and surrounding area, calling the cat while looking for it, asking neighbors if they had seen the cat and would keep an eye out for it or help search, and walking around during the day looking for the cat. 

The most triumphant advertising tactics were putting up posters and distributing flyers about the cat. Although many people called their local shelter about their missing cat in this study, it was not a common way for them to be reunited (fewer than 2%).

It’s also worth considering the strategies people use if they find a lost pet. It seems many people will not take the animal to a local shelter/animal control because of fears of euthanasia. Instead, the tactics they use to find owners include advertisements in the newspaper, walking around the neighborhood, and putting up signs. 

Social media has grown considerably since this survey was done and is likely a much more significant factor these days. Still, it is essential to remember that some owners may not be reached by this method as not everyone uses social media.

Remember to think about what it feels like for your cat and the kinds of places where they might hide. Cats have flexible spines, and their collar bone is not connected to other bones so that they can squeeze into narrow gaps. If they are timid and shy, be quiet when searching so that you won’t startle them. Also, think about what happened before them disappearing if it gives any clues as to where they might be.

If your cat has just run out of the door, don’t chase them. Keep them insight and try to persuade them to come to you; this may involve getting low down, calling them, not looking directly at them (which can be scary to a cat), and reaching your hand or a finger out to see if they will come up to you. Shaking the treat packet may also help. 

An indoors-only cat will want to get home again, so make sure they have a clear path back indoors and don’t get in their way.

Many lost cats come home by themselves.

If you are not sure where your cat is, search carefully inside the house if they are under furniture, in a wardrobe, in the basement, or some other hiding place. Cats can get into some surprising places, especially if they are fearful and new to your home. A friend had a cat hide inside a box-spring mattress. Similarly, they may be able to get inside your settee, open cupboard doors or drawers (which may shut behind them), hide in small gaps behind furniture, get in behind the washing machine or fridge, hide behind books on shelves, or curl up underneath your clean linen.

The most successful strategy is searching on foot. Most cats are found close to home and search very (very) carefully in the immediate area. 

Look in places where a scared cat might hide, such as in bushes, in sheds, under decks. Remember to look up too, since cats like high places and might be hiding in the branches of a tree or on the roof of a shop or shed.

It’s a good idea to search at a quiet time of day.

After dark, you can search with a flashlight. You might see the light reflect from their eyes. When searching, take a treat packet with you and shake it from time to time, but remember a scared cat may not dare to come out to you.

If your kit is indoor-only, you could put their litter box out close to the point where they left. The idea is that cats have excellent noses and will be able to smell it. They may find it reassuring, come back to use it, or wait nearby. However, if your cat has outdoor access, there seems little point in doing this as they will be used to toileting outside anyway, and the smell may only bring other cats into the area to investigate.

Make a hiding place right by the door. A cardboard box turned upside down, and with a hole cut out to make an entrance will do. Put some of your cat’s bedding inside it. You’re providing somewhere for your cat to hide if they come back when you aren’t there to let them in. You can put food and water nearby too (but be aware that this may attract rodents and other animals).

Remember to listen in case you hear your cat meowing. If you have a baby monitor, you could leave it outside the front door in case you hear a meow. If you have a trail cam, set it up so that you will see if your cat is in your yard (or your neighbor’s yard, with permission).

Speak to neighbors and ask if they have seen your cat. Ask them to check hiding places on their property carefully, or if they will let you search their yard for your cat.

If you find your cat in a tree and believe them to be stuck, call local arborists to find one who will go up to get your cat. Sometimes shelters or community cat organizations keep a list of arborists willing to rescue cats from trees.

Make ‘lost cat’ flyers with your cat’s photo on them and put them up in the neighborhood where people will see them, such as near community mailboxes or on utility poles. Include your phone number so that people can contact you if they see your cat, but don’t put your name and address for security reasons.

Post your ‘lost cat’ flyer to social media too. Make the post public so that it is shareable, and share it with any missing pets and neighborhood groups in your area. Again, don’t post your address.

Call your vet and tell them your cat is missing. You might be able to put up a flyer at their office too.

Visit your local animal shelter and animal control in case someone has taken your cat there. Some will take details of missing cats to keep on file. 

If you have recently moved house, you should also search back at your old address, as there have been cases of cats going back to where they used to live.

If you want to put out a trap for your cat, your local shelter, community cat rescue, or animal control may be able to assist. 

.

Above all, keep searching close to home (very close to home for an indoors-only cat). This is the most important thing to do. When you find your cat, remember to update social media postings and take down the flyers you put up in the neighborhood.

 Tips to Help Find a Lost Cat

  1. Start Looking Early
  2. Start Looking Close By
  3. Talk to Your Neighbours
  4. Think Like Your Cat
  5. Put Up Posters
  6. Look When It’s Dark and Quiet
  7. Set Up a Baby Monitor
  8. Use Facebook and Other Social Media
  9. Think Positively
  10. Don’t Give Up

If you think your cat is hiding nearby, you can try putting out some strong-smelling fish when it gets dark. Do it concurrently every night, then try to keep watch from a distance to see if your cat will venture out to eat it. When he is starving enough, he will venture out when he feels secure, generally under night cover.

 Indoor cats that have escaped are very likely to be hiding near your house. They have panicked and gone into survival mode, so they are probably hiding within a three house radius. They are too frightened to move and will likely not respond to your calls. They are hiding in silence not to attract any predators; they are following their survival instinct.

When any cat is hurt or scared, they are likely to go into hiding and not respond to your calls. You have to remember that cats don’t think like humans. Even though they may recognize your voice, they may not respond to it because their ancestor instincts tell them its safer to remain quiet so as not to attract any attention.

Look When It’s Dark and Calm

If your cat is lost or sneaking, it may be waiting until it’s dark to come out and search for food. Therefore, it is best to try and wait until late at night when the roads are quiet to look for your cat. At this time, your cat is more likely to hear your calls and to respond. Remember to stop from time to time and listen to your cat.

Why the Second Wave of the 1918 Spanish Flu Was So Bloody

Why the Second Wave of the 1918 Spanish Flu Was So Bloody

People are so ready to get back to life, forgetting that in 1918 the second wave of the Spanish Flu reportedly killed 20-50 million. The first wave only killed 3-5 million. History does indeed repeat.

The horrific scale of the 1918 influenza pandemic—known as the “Spanish flu”—is hard to fathom. The virus infected 500 million people worldwide and killed an estimated 20 million to 50 million victims—that’s more than all of the soldiers and civilians died during World War I consolidated. 

While the global pandemic lasted for twenty-four months, a significant amount of deaths were packed into three exceptionally rough months in the autumn of 1918. Annalists now accept that the deadly sharpness of the Spanish Flu’s “second wave” was caused by a mutated virus dispersed by wartime company actions.

When the Spanish Flu first appeared in early March 1918, it had all the hallmarks of the seasonal Flu, albeit a profoundly transmissible, infectious contagious, dangerous, and destructive strain. One of the first recorded cases was Albert Gitchell, a U.S. Army cook at Camp Funston in Kansas, who was hospitalized with a 104-degree fever. The virus expanded swiftly through the Army base, home to 54,000 troops. By the end of the month, 1,100 soldiers had been hospitalized, and 38 had fallen after contracting pneumonia.

As U.S. troops stationed en masse for the war effort in Europe, they carried the Spanish Flu with them. Throughout April and May of 1918, the virus flowed like wildfire through England, France, Spain, and Italy. A predicted three-quarter of the French military was tainted in the spring of 1918 and as many as half of British troops. Yet the first wave of the virus didn’t appear to be particularly deadly, with symptoms like high fever and malaise usually lasting only three days. According to restricted public health data from the time, fatality rates were related to annual Flu.

Historians believe that the fast spread of Spanish Flu in the fall of 1918 was somewhat to impute on public health officials opposed to imposing quarantines during wartime. In Britain, for example, a government official named Arthur Newsholme understood full well that a strict private lockdown was the most reliable way to fight the scope of the profoundly infectious virus. But he wouldn’t jeopardize damaging the battle manufacturers by keeping munitions industry artisans and other noncombatants homely.

According to many researchers, “the constant needs of warfare proved to incur [the] risk of spreading disease” and encouraged Britons to “carry on” during the pandemic.

A severe nursing shortage further thwarted the public health answer to the crisis in the United States as thousands of nurses had been deployed to military camps and the front lines. The deficit was worsened by the American Red Cross’s refusal to use trained African American nurses until the worst of the pandemic had already passed.

1918 Pandemic (H1N1 virus)

Other Languages

pandeminc header 2 Why the Second Wave of the 1918 Spanish Flu Was So Bloody

The 1918 influenza pandemic was the most severe pandemic in recent history. It was caused by an H1N1 virus with genes of avian origin. Although there is no universal consensus regarding where the virus originated, it spread worldwide from 1918-1919.  In the United States, it was first identified in military personnel in spring 1918. It is estimated that about 500 million people or one-third of the world’s population became infected with this virus. The number of deaths was estimated to be at least 50 million worldwide with about 675,000 occurring in the United States.

Mortality was high in people younger than 5 years old, 20-40 years old, and 65 years and older. The high mortality in healthy people, including those in the 20-40 year age group, was a unique feature of this pandemic. While the 1918 H1N1 virus has been synthesized and evaluated, the properties that made it so devastating are not well understood. With no vaccine to protect against influenza infection and no antibiotics to treat secondary bacterial infections that can be associated with influenza infections, control efforts worldwide were limited to non-pharmaceutical interventions such as isolation, quarantine, good personal hygiene, use of disinfectants, and limitations of public gatherings, which were applied unevenly.

Firefighters Net PETA Award for Saving Missing Dog From Sinkhole

Firefighters Net PETA Award for Saving Missing Dog From Sinkhole

State College, Pa. – PETA’s Compassionate Fire Department Award is on its way to Alpha Fire Company for its swift rescue of a dog named Skye, who toppled into a sinkhole after running off when her guardians let her off her leash during a walk on Monday. The couple searched for their missing dog until Wednesday morning, when they heard faint barking coming from a sinkhole, where Skye had fallen 15 feet. Firefighters quickly rushed to the scene, lowering Assistant Chief Dennis Harris into the hole with a rigged dog harness to retrieve Skye, who was lifted to safety and reunited with her family. She was taken to a veterinarian for a checkup and found to be uninjured.

“These determined firefighters were all that stood between this dog and a slow, lonely, agonizing death,” says PETA Senior Director Colleen O’Brien. “PETA encourages caring people to take this story as inspiration to come to the aid of animals in need.”

PETA, whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to abuse in any way,” is sending the department a framed certificate, a box of delicious vegan cookies, and a copy of The Engine 2 Diet—a Texas firefighter’s 28-day plan for staying in prime firefighting shape with plant-based meals.

PETA reminds all dog guardians to keep dogs on leashes at all times during walks and to ensure that their yards are secure with sturdy fencing and no open manholes or pipes. While outdoors, guardians should walk their animal companions with a leash and a comfortable, secure harness and keep a close eye on them.

for its swift rescue of a dog named Skye, who toppled into a sinkhole after running off when her guardians let her off her leash during a walk on Monday. The couple searched for their missing dog until Wednesday morning, when they heard faint barking coming from a sinkhole, where Skye had fallen 15 feet. Firefighters quickly rushed to the scene, lowering Assistant Chief Dennis Harris into the hole with a rigged dog harness to retrieve Skye, who was lifted to safety and reunited with her family. She was taken to a veterinarian for a checkup and found to be uninjured.

“These determined firefighters were all that stood between this dog and a slow, lonely, agonizing death,” says PETA Senior Director Colleen O’Brien. “PETA encourages caring people to take this story as inspiration to come to the aid of animals in need.”

PETA, whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to abuse in any way,” is sending the department a framed certificate, a box of delicious vegan cookies, and a copy of The Engine 2 Diet—a Texas firefighter’s 28-day plan for staying in prime firefighting shape with plant-based meals.

PETA reminds all dog guardians to keep dogs on leashes at all times during walks and to ensure that their yards are secure with sturdy fencing and no open manholes or pipes. While outdoors, guardians should walk their animal companions with a leash and a comfortable, secure harness and keep a close eye on them.

Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial