Finding the right veterinarian

Finding the right veterinarian

Get testimonials

Talk to your neighbors, friends, co-workers, friends of the gym, and family. Find out whom they use and are willing to recommend. Talk to animal rights lovers who likely know of veterinarians knowledgeable about your breed and the types of problems they experience. 

Visit a local veterinary clinic without your pets.

Take a tour and examine whether the office is spotless and well organized. Ask about services they provide, find out what hours they are open, and ask what provisions are made for emergency coverage (after-hours and weekends). Many veterinary practices offer in-house digital x-rays, dental x-rays, pet dental care, ultrasounds, and radiology, as well as veterinary surgical services such as general surgery and neutering, orthopedic procedures, and assistance with chemotherapy. Find out what arrangements are available for specialty referrals. What is the average wait time for making a non-emergency appointment? Can you request an appointment with a specific veterinarian?

Find out whether the practice’s treatment philosophies match yours.

Ask the veterinarians for their beliefs about treating cancer, spaying and neutering, supporting senior dogs, and euthanasia. Do they believe in prescribing holistic or alternative treatments when appropriate? Do they emphasize preventative care? If you have children, would they be welcome to accompany you for a routine office visit? It’s great to be able to teach your children what’s involved in responsible pet care. Is the vet patient when answering your questions?

Consider location

A close and convenient location is beneficial when you’re taking your dog to the vet. And should your pet need emergency care, you’ll want to know exactly where to go. If your new veterinarian does not provide 24-hour care, they should give precise directions to the nearest 24-hour emergency facility.

Ask about fees

Compare charges and avoid deals that look too good to be true. As with most products or services, you get what you pay for. Your best course of action is to ask ahead of time about fees, costs of procedures and what methods of payments are available and expected. Find out if the veterinarian provides written estimates for services. Are payment plans or financial assistance options available if you need them? If your pet is insured, does the clinic accept your insurance plan? Are you provided with a detailed explanation of services for every visit?

Check on professional accreditations and experience.

How many veterinarians and licensed veterinary technicians are on staff? Please find out how long they have been in practice and about their education and training background.

Visit the veterinarian’s office with your pets.

Stop in with your pets and observe the “bedside manner” of the veterinary and office staff. How do they try to make your pets feel at ease? Have they set up the waiting area and examination rooms to make your pets feel as comfortable as possible? Today’s pets live longer, healthier lives thanks to the availability of high-quality veterinary care, preventive care, and pet owners’ careful monitoring of their animals for early signs of illness. When choosing your family’s veterinarian, use the same care and criteria for selecting a physician or dentist. Your intent should be to find the veterinarian who you think can best meet your pet’s medical needs and with whom you feel comfortable in establishing a long-term veterinarian-client-patient relationship.

mon146015 Finding the right veterinarian

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Peace 4 Animals & WAN Promote a Plant-Based Diet & Support Farm Sanctuary With The ‘Save a Life This Thanksgiving, Adopt a Turkey’ Billboard Campaign In Los Angeles

Peace 4 Animals & WAN Promote a Plant-Based Diet & Support Farm Sanctuary With The ‘Save a Life This Thanksgiving, Adopt a Turkey’ Billboard Campaign In Los Angeles

Peace 4 Animals Logo Peace 4 Animals & WAN Promote a Plant Based Diet & Support Farm Sanctuary With The Save a Life This Thanksgiving, Adopt a Turkey Billboard Campaign In Los Angeles

LOS ANGELES, Nov. 18, 2020 /PRNewswire/ —Peace 4 AnimalsWorld Animal News (WAN), and Farm Sanctuary are once again encouraging people to make the compassionate choice for the holidays by adopting a turkey rather than eating one for Thanksgiving dinner. 

Peace 4 Animals   WAN Peace 4 Animals & WAN Promote a Plant Based Diet & Support Farm Sanctuary With The Save a Life This Thanksgiving, Adopt a Turkey Billboard Campaign In Los Angeles
Peace 4 Animals & WAN Promote A Plant-Based Diet & Support Farm Sanctuary With The ‘Save A Life This Thanksgiving, Adopt A Turkey’ Billboard Campaign In Los Angeles

“We began the ‘Save A Life This Thanksgiving, Adopt A Turkey’ billboard campaign after realizing that something needed to be done to raise awareness about the estimated 46 million turkeys who are killed in the United States for Thanksgiving alone each year,” said Katie Cleary, Founder and President of Peace 4 Animals and World Animal News. “Taking action to save the lives of animals is the most important thing that we can do to create positive change for ourselves, our planet, and of course, for the animals. This campaign in partnership with Farm Sanctuary sends a clear message to choose compassion on your plate and change the way we’re conditioned to think about farm animals in this country; to actually make a connection to who we are eating.” 

The 2020 ‘Save A Life This Thanksgiving Adopt A Turkey’ billboard is strategically located on the highly-trafficked 710 Long Beach Freeway near the Imperial Highway exit in the city of Lynwood in Los Angeles County.

“If 2020 has taught us anything, it’s the importance of empathy and that our choices impact the lives of others,” said Farm Sanctuary President and Co-Founder Gene Baur. “If we can celebrate a more joyous ‘turkey day’ without causing unnecessary killing and suffering, why wouldn’t we? By widening our circle of compassion to include one of the most abused creatures on the planet, we can prevent the enormous harm that factory farming causes people and other animals.”

For only $35.00, anyone from anywhere around the world can sponsor a turkey that was saved by Farm Sanctuary. The rescued turkeys are given a new life at one of the organization’s sanctuaries located in Watkins Glen, New York, or Los Angeles, California. 

Venus “The Champion,” Ferris “The Hotshot,” Tutu “The Charmer,” Sandy “The Sweetheart,” and Jackie “The Queen” are among Farm Sanctuary’s adoptable turkeys this year. The fee to adopt the flock is only $150.00.

“Thanksgiving and turkeys have become synonymous, but sadly, not in a way that celebrates them. At Farm Sanctuary, we’re trying to change that,” stated Farm Sanctuary’s CEO, Megan Watkins. “By highlighting the unique personalities of these birds, while also exposing the abuse that they face in an unjust food system, we inspire people to start new compassionate traditions, like adopting a rescued turkey for Thanksgiving instead of eating one.”

Farm Sanctuary will send everyone who adopts a turkey an adoption certificate that reminds people that turkeys are living, feeling beings, who deserve to be treated with kindness and compassion. 

“Spreading awareness about the benefits of a plant-based diet is among the many critical issues WAN and Peace 4 Animals strive to address on a daily basis, and we welcome the opportunity to support other like-minded organizations such as Farm Sanctuary to amplify this important message,” shared Cleary. “It is more important than ever to spread compassion this year. Adopting a turkey instead of eating one on Thanksgiving is a life-changing step in the right direction towards a more compassionate world.”

Please join Peace 4 Animals, WAN, and Farm Sanctuary in making this Thanksgiving a compassionate one for ALL by sponsoring a TurkeyHERE!

For further information or to schedule a time to speak with said Katie Cleary, Founder and President of Peace 4 Animals and World Animal News, please contact Lauren Lewis at 259317 [at] email4pr [dot] com or (818) 970-0052

SOURCE Peace 4 Animals

Finding a missing cat

Finding a missing cat

finding a missingcat 1024x683 Finding a missing cat

Most of the cats that were located had not gone far from their homes. Indoor-only cats were found 128 feet from home, on average, and indoor-outdoor cats 985 feet from home (although this distinction was not significant). For all the cats (indoors, indoor-outdoor, outdoors), the house’s median distance was 164 feet, and 75% of cats were located within 1600 feet.

This means that if your cat is missing, you should search very precisely close to home. Being cats, you will not be astonished to discover that some of those found turned up waiting by the door to be let in. Cats were often found in nearby hiding places such as hiding in a yard, in bushes, under decks, or inside sheds. Cats that were considered prying were the most likely to be found in a neighbor’s house. Most lost cars are near you.

A physical search for the cat was most likely to be successful, and this included searching the yard and surrounding area, calling the cat while looking for it, asking neighbors if they had seen the cat and would keep an eye out for it or help search, and walking around during the day looking for the cat. 

The most triumphant advertising tactics were putting up posters and distributing flyers about the cat. Although many people called their local shelter about their missing cat in this study, it was not a common way for them to be reunited (fewer than 2%).

It’s also worth considering the strategies people use if they find a lost pet. It seems many people will not take the animal to a local shelter/animal control because of fears of euthanasia. Instead, the tactics they use to find owners include advertisements in the newspaper, walking around the neighborhood, and putting up signs. 

Social media has grown considerably since this survey was done and is likely a much more significant factor these days. Still, it is essential to remember that some owners may not be reached by this method as not everyone uses social media.

Remember to think about what it feels like for your cat and the kinds of places where they might hide. Cats have flexible spines, and their collar bone is not connected to other bones so that they can squeeze into narrow gaps. If they are timid and shy, be quiet when searching so that you won’t startle them. Also, think about what happened before them disappearing if it gives any clues as to where they might be.

If your cat has just run out of the door, don’t chase them. Keep them insight and try to persuade them to come to you; this may involve getting low down, calling them, not looking directly at them (which can be scary to a cat), and reaching your hand or a finger out to see if they will come up to you. Shaking the treat packet may also help. 

An indoors-only cat will want to get home again, so make sure they have a clear path back indoors and don’t get in their way.

Many lost cats come home by themselves.

If you are not sure where your cat is, search carefully inside the house if they are under furniture, in a wardrobe, in the basement, or some other hiding place. Cats can get into some surprising places, especially if they are fearful and new to your home. A friend had a cat hide inside a box-spring mattress. Similarly, they may be able to get inside your settee, open cupboard doors or drawers (which may shut behind them), hide in small gaps behind furniture, get in behind the washing machine or fridge, hide behind books on shelves, or curl up underneath your clean linen.

The most successful strategy is searching on foot. Most cats are found close to home and search very (very) carefully in the immediate area. 

Look in places where a scared cat might hide, such as in bushes, in sheds, under decks. Remember to look up too, since cats like high places and might be hiding in the branches of a tree or on the roof of a shop or shed.

It’s a good idea to search at a quiet time of day.

After dark, you can search with a flashlight. You might see the light reflect from their eyes. When searching, take a treat packet with you and shake it from time to time, but remember a scared cat may not dare to come out to you.

If your kit is indoor-only, you could put their litter box out close to the point where they left. The idea is that cats have excellent noses and will be able to smell it. They may find it reassuring, come back to use it, or wait nearby. However, if your cat has outdoor access, there seems little point in doing this as they will be used to toileting outside anyway, and the smell may only bring other cats into the area to investigate.

Make a hiding place right by the door. A cardboard box turned upside down, and with a hole cut out to make an entrance will do. Put some of your cat’s bedding inside it. You’re providing somewhere for your cat to hide if they come back when you aren’t there to let them in. You can put food and water nearby too (but be aware that this may attract rodents and other animals).

Remember to listen in case you hear your cat meowing. If you have a baby monitor, you could leave it outside the front door in case you hear a meow. If you have a trail cam, set it up so that you will see if your cat is in your yard (or your neighbor’s yard, with permission).

Speak to neighbors and ask if they have seen your cat. Ask them to check hiding places on their property carefully, or if they will let you search their yard for your cat.

If you find your cat in a tree and believe them to be stuck, call local arborists to find one who will go up to get your cat. Sometimes shelters or community cat organizations keep a list of arborists willing to rescue cats from trees.

Make ‘lost cat’ flyers with your cat’s photo on them and put them up in the neighborhood where people will see them, such as near community mailboxes or on utility poles. Include your phone number so that people can contact you if they see your cat, but don’t put your name and address for security reasons.

Post your ‘lost cat’ flyer to social media too. Make the post public so that it is shareable, and share it with any missing pets and neighborhood groups in your area. Again, don’t post your address.

Call your vet and tell them your cat is missing. You might be able to put up a flyer at their office too.

Visit your local animal shelter and animal control in case someone has taken your cat there. Some will take details of missing cats to keep on file. 

If you have recently moved house, you should also search back at your old address, as there have been cases of cats going back to where they used to live.

If you want to put out a trap for your cat, your local shelter, community cat rescue, or animal control may be able to assist. 

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Above all, keep searching close to home (very close to home for an indoors-only cat). This is the most important thing to do. When you find your cat, remember to update social media postings and take down the flyers you put up in the neighborhood.

 Tips to Help Find a Lost Cat

  1. Start Looking Early
  2. Start Looking Close By
  3. Talk to Your Neighbours
  4. Think Like Your Cat
  5. Put Up Posters
  6. Look When It’s Dark and Quiet
  7. Set Up a Baby Monitor
  8. Use Facebook and Other Social Media
  9. Think Positively
  10. Don’t Give Up

If you think your cat is hiding nearby, you can try putting out some strong-smelling fish when it gets dark. Do it concurrently every night, then try to keep watch from a distance to see if your cat will venture out to eat it. When he is starving enough, he will venture out when he feels secure, generally under night cover.

 Indoor cats that have escaped are very likely to be hiding near your house. They have panicked and gone into survival mode, so they are probably hiding within a three house radius. They are too frightened to move and will likely not respond to your calls. They are hiding in silence not to attract any predators; they are following their survival instinct.

When any cat is hurt or scared, they are likely to go into hiding and not respond to your calls. You have to remember that cats don’t think like humans. Even though they may recognize your voice, they may not respond to it because their ancestor instincts tell them its safer to remain quiet so as not to attract any attention.

Look When It’s Dark and Calm

If your cat is lost or sneaking, it may be waiting until it’s dark to come out and search for food. Therefore, it is best to try and wait until late at night when the roads are quiet to look for your cat. At this time, your cat is more likely to hear your calls and to respond. Remember to stop from time to time and listen to your cat.

Teller County Sheriff: warrant issued for a Trump’s supporter accused of beating and dismembering 2 dogs

Teller County Sheriff: warrant issued for a Trump’s supporter accused of beating and dismembering 2 dogs

The Teller County Sheriff’s Office has issued a warrant for a man they say beat and dismembered two dogs.

Officials say the suspect is 30-year-old Matthew Stephen Dieringer, a Trump supporter, from Pueblo, Colorado. He is being accused of killing two of his roommate’s dogs.

mattewaaa Teller County Sheriff: warrant issued for a Trumps supporter accused of beating and dismembering 2 dogs

They add Dieringer was last seen in the Manitou Springs area and has an active felony warrant for two counts of Aggravated Cruelty to animals. At this time, officials believe he may have dyed his hair another color, possibly darker.

In a statement released Tuesday, the sheriff’s department said, “Dieringer is alleged to have beaten to death the victim’s brown, seven-year-old Australian Cattle Dog “Suka” and also to have killed and dismembered the victim’s other black dog, “Hayoka.” A necropsy confirmed Suka died of blunt trauma.”

Prego Launches Vegan Pasta Sauce

Prego Launches Vegan Pasta Sauce

Pasta sauce brand Prego just launched their plant-based vegan meat sauce. The sauce is not only their first vegan meat-based sauce but also the United States and possibly the world.

PREGOSAUCE 1024x683 Prego Launches Vegan Pasta Sauce

The new vegan pasta sauce line is called Prego+ Plant Protein and is a tomato-based sauce that contains soy-based ground meat with 4 grams of protein per serving.


“We were inspired to create Prego+ Plant Protein for consumers who are increasingly integrating plant-based foods into their diets to get additional protein,” said Steve Siegal, Vice President of Marketing, Meals & Sauces.

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